Monthly Archives: January 2016

Earn a Commission and Not Paid in Full or Discharged Before It’s Paid? You May Have Strong Legal Rights

Sometimes, in order to save money, an employer will try to shortchange a commissioned employee and pay less than the full commissions earned per the parties’ arrangements. Worse, some employers will fire a commissioned employee after the employee earns a commission but before the commission is paid. This is more likely to occur when the commission at issue is large, and the employer is focused on short-term thinking, i.e. perceived cost-savings of not paying the full big commission (while disregarding the big-picture problem of firing an employee capable of making even more big sales).

Some employers who do this, knowing there could be legal problems, present the shortchanged employee with a contract and/or severance agreement in the case of a discharged employee. Typically, the contract or severance agreement seeks to get the employee to accept a much lesser payment than the full value of the commission and/or other income lost as a result of the discharge.

If you have been shorted on a commission and/or fired by an employer looking to avoid paying you your full commission, please know you may have strong legal rights. It is important to examine your potential rights before you sign a severance agreement, as most severance agreements will waive potential legal claims.

What legal rights might you you have?  I represent workers across the U.S. with unpaid wage claims, and there can be quite strong claims, depending on the State, circumstances and commission arrangement or contract. In Wisconsin, for example, there are a number of legal claims that potentially provide strong legal rights to someone who has not been paid earned commissions.  These claims may include breach of contract claims, wage claims under Chapter 109 of the Wisconsin Statutes, equitable claims, or other important case-law rights (e.g. Phillips v. US Bank) that hold companies responsible for discharging commissioned employees or otherwise trying to reduce their commissions.

If you suspect you may have legal rights, you should consider discussing the matter with an attorney before taking action on your own. Some attorneys, including myself, offer free consultations to evaluate commissioned employees’ situations and determine if there are legal options and/or negotiation leverage worth exploring.

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Filed under Employee Info/Tips - Pre-Litigation - Unpaid Wages, Uncategorized

Right to a Written Decision for Dept. of Labor H-1B Wage Complaint

**This post was cross-posted at my other blog www.h1blegalrights.com.

If you’re an H-1B worker and filed a wage complaint with the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), you have a right to receive a written decision from DOL. DOL’s written decision must state important information, including: (1) if you are owed wages or not; (2) the reasons for the decision; and (3) your rights to appeal the decision, if you feel it is wrong, and the procedure and deadline to appeal it.

The attorney-authors of this blog have had some H-1B workers/ clients tell us that DOL did not issue them a written decision for their wage complaint. In some instances, the DOL investigator only told the H-1B worker the decision over the phone, did not give much detail about the reason behind the decision, and did not describe appeal rights or procedures.

Please know that you do have rights. If DOL is not allowing you to pursue those rights, you may need to tell DOL what they are required to do under the laws and regulations.

Specifically, the H-1B wage complaint regulation at 20 CFR 655.815 describes what a DOL investigator must do after investigating your H-1B wage complaint. In particular, this regulation says DOL must:

1. Mail a written decision (called a “determination) to you, the H-1B employer, and certain other people involved in the case.

2. This written determination must state DOL’s decision about your case and the reason for the decision. If DOL determines the employer has violated the laws or regulations, the decision must describe the remedies, such as back wages owed to you.

3. The determination must also explain appeal rights, how to file an appeal and the filing deadline.

If the DOL investigator has made a decision in your case, but has not given you anything in writing, you can write or email the investigator and mention the above obligations. That is, you can mention that 20 CFR 655.815 requires DOL to provide you with a written decision and notification about your appeal rights.

Please note that the appeal filing deadline is extremely short. So it may be necessary to follow up with DOL as soon as possible, in writing or an email, and seek a prompt written determination. It is important to get clarity, as soon as possible, about an appeal deadline and procedures. If an appeal is not timely filed, you may forever lose your legal rights to appeal.

If you have not received a written determination from DOL and are unable to address your concerns on your own, you could consider consulting with an experienced attorney to determine your options for proceeding with your case and protecting your legal rights.

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Filed under Employee Tip - H-1B, H-1B, Uncategorized