Monthly Archives: October 2010

Interesting Article re U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s Strong Use of Litigation (Despite Tort Reform View As to Individuals)

[The U.S. Chamber of Commerce] has its own multimillion dollar affiliate, the Institute for Legal Reform (ILR), whose sole mission is to restrict the ability of individuals harmed by negligent corporations to file suit.

Yet ironically, the Chamber is also one of the most aggressive litigators in Washington, D.C., appearing in hundreds of lawsuits a year. The Chamber has its own litigation arm, the National Chamber Litigation Center (NCLC), which both files its own lawsuits and enters into the lawsuits of others more than 130 times a year.

Interesting article about U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s strong use of litigation in support of corporate interests, despite its opposition to litigation by individuals (e.g. tort reform).

I’m not interested in calling the Chamber or anyone else “hypocrites.” But it is important people realize that efforts like “tort reform” (despite a broad-sounding label) have a narrower intention: to protect corporations from lawsuits by individuals alleging harm by corporations. Tort reform is NOT an effort to reduce lawsuits across the board, and is certainly not an effort to reduce lawsuits filed BY corporations. That is a right that corporations want to keep intact because it serves their interests. If you are thinking this is okay with you, from the perspective of your business, keep in mind that you are an individual too, and you need fair access to the legal system in either capacity.

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The 10 Biggest Corporate Campaign Contributors in U.S. Politics| Via DailyFinance.com

Here are 10 companies that give America the best elections that money can buy, arranged in ascending order by campaign dollars contributed between 1989 and 2010.

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Wisconsin Law Now Prohibits Two More Types of Discrimination, Based on Political and Religious Communications

The Wisconsin Legislature has added two forms of prohibited discrimination to Wisconsin employment law, which concern religious and political communications.

Now, a Wisconsin employer must not discriminate against an employee for:

  • declining to attend a meeting about religious matters
  • declining to participate in any communication about religious matters
  • declining to attend a meeting about political matters; or
  • declining to participate in any communication about political matters.

 

Under Section 111.321of the Wisconsin Fair Employment Act (WFEA) (see p. 11 of the .pdf version of WFEA), titled “Prohibited bases of discrimination,” a WI employer is now prohibited from discriminating against an employee for declining to attend a meeting or to participate in any communication about religious matters or political matters.”

This new phrase/amendment to WFEA was completed by an Act of the Wisconsin legislature, and took effect on May 27, 2010. 

An employer’s discriminating actions on or after May 27, 2010, that are based on political and religious issues above, are potentially actionable as discrimination law claims.

 

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